Uniswap Blocks 253 Addresses Over The Past Four Months

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“We have blocked 253 addresses to date via TRM (roughly four months). As @Banteg has been tweeting recently, over-compliance by blocking according to proximity can result in massive swaths of innocent users being incorrectly banned”, notes Jordan Frankfurt.

Decentralized exchange platform Uniswap blacklists 253 addresses that allegedly interacted with TRM Labs, citing ties to crimes involving stolen funds as the primary reason for the block.

The news was brought to light by developer Banteg, who tweeted that Uniswap has provided an “unexpected level of transparency” following GitHub comments posted by Uniswap engineer JFrankurt.

The GitHub post highlights that Uniswap has publically blocked 253 addresses that are either directly sanctioned or are recipients of hacked or laundered crypto assets. 

After analyzing the logs of Uniswap’s servers, Banteg claims that the dex platform blacklisted out of 253 addresses, 30 are ENS domain names, and might be legitimate users. This matches up with reports dating back to mid-April stating that innocent users were banned by TRM Labs’ front end.

Banteg uploaded the cleaned-up transactions and further revealed that Uniswap used seven categories corresponding to different crimes to assess the risk levels posed by the blacklisted addresses, with some addresses appearing on all lists. Lastly, Banteg states that Uniswap has blocked at least three alleged burn addresses.       

Written by
Ayush Pande
“We have blocked 253 addresses to date via TRM (roughly four months). As @Banteg has been tweeting recently, over-compliance by blocking according to proximity can result in massive swaths of innocent users being incorrectly banned”, notes Jordan Frankfurt.

Decentralized exchange platform Uniswap blacklists 253 addresses that allegedly interacted with TRM Labs, citing ties to crimes involving stolen funds as the primary reason for the block.

The news was brought to light by developer Banteg, who tweeted that Uniswap has provided an “unexpected level of transparency” following GitHub comments posted by Uniswap engineer JFrankurt.

The GitHub post highlights that Uniswap has publically blocked 253 addresses that are either directly sanctioned or are recipients of hacked or laundered crypto assets. 

After analyzing the logs of Uniswap’s servers, Banteg claims that the dex platform blacklisted out of 253 addresses, 30 are ENS domain names, and might be legitimate users. This matches up with reports dating back to mid-April stating that innocent users were banned by TRM Labs’ front end.

Banteg uploaded the cleaned-up transactions and further revealed that Uniswap used seven categories corresponding to different crimes to assess the risk levels posed by the blacklisted addresses, with some addresses appearing on all lists. Lastly, Banteg states that Uniswap has blocked at least three alleged burn addresses.       

Written by
Ayush Pande